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. they are also building more cities than anybody else, going from 75 cities of 1 million people to two 20 cities of 1 million people to almost 20 cities of ten million people and in doing that they will be building our highways and power plants of tomorrow and the czech writer has a lot of power in what these look like so they will be dictating what those things look like as well and as they create vast reserves of wealth and giving it to people who need to borrow it europeans who need to borrow it gain influence that way and when they go to latin america where they are the number one trading partner investor in brazil or africa where they are number one investor they get a lot of influence that way. is not just economic growth but economic leverage and economic power. they are growing as a soft power leader in the world and that is something we need to watch carefully because their interests do not always a line which hours. >> host: next call from maurice in walton, ky. >> caller: hello. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: i would like to ask mr. rothkopf to cite some examples of large corpor
, and that is significant because it really does show and it really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the first quarter of the first game and still be wrapped around it at the end of sunday night football. they're so soft, so incredibly comfortable and that is why so many people pick them up to give to their kids come grandkids, for bed so far, you cannot go wrong with this as a gift and if you do have people and of life you know who are fans the different teams come to take advantage of by more and save.it is one of the first items that we offer here, with football fan shop, this goes out each year in and each one is different and unique but
north as delaware city in newcastle. roads and bridges in various parts of our state have been damaged and will need to be repaired or replaced. meanwhile we continue to work at fema and other agencies to determine the full extent of damage. delaware and its local jurisdictions contribute a large amount of resources and a short period of time to prepare for and respond to the storm and to begin rebuilding and its weight. eliminate damage assessment show more will be required and given already state budget we need help in filling the gaps as much as the gulf coast states needed. madam chair, and i just want to say thanks for the chance to share some of these with you today and let you know about the impacts. in delaware we have a long tradition of helping our neighbors, whether they live down the street are well beyond our borders. for years we've helped other sister state suffered from disasters be they hurricanes, tornadoes, floods or wildfires. today, the shoe is on the other foot. we need to help our neighbors, not just in delaware, but all across the country. just as we've been the
corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, a huge amount of damage. they have incredible -- new york city how resilient as people are and how well they are coming back. i think they have about 95% of their transit operations, and the rail was particularly hit amongst all of these east side in lower manhattan, tunnels flooded and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all the passengers in the world in new york city and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg who was here yesterday will be in town today and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee oversees and also the transportation infrastructure and maybe the focus of an additional committee. today we are focused, looking particularly at amrak's structural organization and i might also recall that in the last hearing we will be doing on the northeast corridor, our very first hearing w
before prohibition. usually this is on a city by city basis there would be a neighborhood where you would have the constitution, gambling, drugs, liquor being sold outside of the bigger lipari system all the hours in the night and they control the neighborhoods very happy with a great deal of money. along comes prohibition and suddenly there are large quantities of the physical goods that take up a great deal of space moved from one deal to another specifically in philadelphia. it was much the heart of what the word chemical industry and then shipped from philadelphia to many cities in the midwest so the philadelphia mob had our allies in each of the of your cities but this led to the meeting in the place of 1929 as a lost city taken together as a syndicate, said prices, made contracts and then setting up there in judicial system three involve conflicts one verso none of the table making rules that was child prohibition. the crime as we can to know it of a national scale was prohibition. the optus parallel mobsters need huge amounts of money and perpetrated a great deal of violent crimes.
york city is konrad motyka. he's an fbi agent. agent trained to, what is your view and the fbi association's view changes made to the 1986 law? >> guest: as the proposed changes made their way up committee, there is discussion going forward and a lot of acknowledgment and parts of the law that needs to be tweaked with further input to take one person accused into account. these changes that have been proposed represent a very fundamental change in how these types of stored communications are accessed by law enforcement. mr. nojeim is correct and there is a distinction between content that is fresher than 180 days in content older than 180 days. the proposed amendments to several things. one, for content older than 180 days it increases the legal standard by which law enforcement can obtain the actual content, raising it from a standard of reasonableness to a standard of probable cause and having a search warrant be required to obtain the data from which the form of judicial intervention because a search warrant needs to be signed up by a judge. it also creates a presumption of
what it wase like.ple, imagine something like thaticane going through your neighborhood, your city when you're living in a tent. there's something like 74,000th acre or more of land that hashe been the harvest, you know. more problems ahead that have grown as a result of the earth spooking, if you will, with the hurricane. you have more food insecurity. a number of cholera cases have increased with hurricane sandy. we're dealing and people tend to forget we are -- canceling canceling with urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> where did "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" come from? >> it is anin wy difcu anthologs edited by a group of women here >> miami of women writers called women writers of haitianf decedent.o wr one of theer intellectual wrote. book "so spoke the uncle" he advocated for haitians to take control of their stories, to tell their stories "barack obama: the stories" of their lives at literature and those women, the groups of women got together and edited this that cover the three sections in. the haiti i know, the hai
county and baltimore city people were evacuated from their homes. 41 shoulders were established. the bottom line is we can't -- we want to underscore the point that senator carper made. we came together for communities impacted by the events and use federal government and resources to bring communities back to where they need to be. we were very much in tune, disasters happened in all parts of the country, to be a good neighbor and we need help today. i want to thank president obama for the disaster declaration for maryland. that allows fema to be available for public assistance. we have a request for individual disaster assistance for the individuals who are impacted. that proposal is pending. i will be working to make sure individuals have been impacted by the storm, have a strong partner from the federal government as we can possibly have. i think it is going to be highly likely we will have to have supplemental emergency appropriation bill. that is not in this committee but i do point out we have to make sure resources are available and congress will shortly be adjourning an
by a huge amount of damage. new york city is incredibly resilient. they are coming back well. they have about 95% of the city that was hit. i understand that mayor bloomberg will be in town today. the committee oversees and the transportation infrastructure i might also recall in the northeast corridor, when i became chair of the committee, in the northeast quarter, the progress we have made sense that hearing has took place, it is kind of interesting about choosing topics and we have to reflect the moment. a lot of people when they go home, they go to bed and they count sheep or read a novel. i had a great article about amtrak. i thought it was quite interesting, particularly interesting because it outlined some of the work that amtrak has been doing regarding its reorganization and the structural management -- the way that amtrak is structured, that led me to say that the committee really needed to look at where we are in this whole process and where we have been. amtrak is a global corporation. i was intrigued by a comment that joseph boardman, as the president and ceo, meg. in 2005,
to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the dignity of a president shall candidate to go out in the countryside and make promises to people that he knew h
city governments, state governments in the united states, we have a federal government in the united states and it's only natural that another layer of government that deals with issues of loss. but over the course of the next hundred years from the lives of our children and grandchildren, we will see progress with it. the big question is whether the balance between the power of those public entities and big private enterprises that are the size of most of the biggest countries in the world. it also remains unbalanced. right now, our future is being determined in financial markets that are regulated by anybody. where the risk of a blow is a risk to each of us and those factors have been very successful in shrugging off and keeping away kind of regulation that could mitigate that risk. and the point is we need to pay attention there and we need to balance their, particularly in the united states, we are seriously out of on june 25, 1875 general george armstrong kuster and his entire command were killed by sioux, cheyenne and arapahoe warriors at little bighorn in montana. during this
. there are different philosophers. i talked about my friends that have been killed and working with city high school kids and talked about your duty to their experiences the friends who had been killed, and it was a personal discussion that we never would have had if it weren't for the provocation and at the end of its that's why i never should have said this in the first place. free speech as a moral high ground. they tell you what to say so never see that. like a lot of private colleges it has pretty restrictive speech codes and i know you've talked a little bit about the whole guarantee of the free speech but there's still a lot fewer tools. it's a lot harder to make the case for free speech and private universities how would you recommend we go about that? >> i don't spend too much time on that because i write so much about this. i have some real religion but the distinction of private and public colleges but the answer this question a lot. the first amendment applies to the public colleges. it doesn't apply to the public. there's something called the leonard law that applies the first amendment
teenage use in your view to live outside some of the major cities of the u.s.? >> it could be. i mean, obviously there are pros and cons. we miss living near new york city. obviously we had a severe crisis, which i hope we don't. i'm not sure that large population centers where somebody would want to be. obviously it would be unthinkable should happen. it's not why we moved, if there were a really bad attack of one type of another, we don't live in a concentrated area. there are advantages. >> we have been talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations in las vegas. >>> booktv on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch viewers, get up-to-date information facebook.com/booktv. booktv sat down with philip auerswald to discuss his book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he was in atense for the fall for the book festival held annually at the university. it's about a half an hour. >>> now joining us h
to assist the construction of up to 120,000 new homes and delivering on flood defend schemes in more cities. on top of broadband expansion for our countryside and larger cities, we're funding broadband in 123 smaller -- 12 smaller cities, cambridge, darby, oxford, portsmouth, york, newport, aberdeen, and derry, londonderry. in addition to a third of a billion pounds announced this autumn for british science, we are today announcing 600 million pounds more for the u.k. scientific research infrastructure, and since improving our education system is the best investment in a competitive economy, i am today committing 270 million pounds to fund improvements in further education colleges and one billion pounds to expand good schools and build 100 new free schools and academies. [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, scotland, wales and northern ireland will get their share of additional capital spending put at their disposal as involved in administrations. on top of this five billion pounds of support for business, we are ready to provide guarantees for up to 40 billion pounds more. today i can annou
developed a deep love for baltimore city and a true understanding how baltimore works. bailey became a creative genius at promoting and highlighting the many achievements of the city under mayor schaefer. before mayor schaefer left city hall, he nominated bailey to serve as president of the baltimore city school board. in that role she helped parents and a navigate the school bureaucracy, suggested workable solutions for teachers and brought a commonsense approach to the baltimore city school system. but bailey's knowledge and expertise goes beyond knowing how government works. she has had her pulse on baltimore and on maryland. she knows the key players this the city and state, many on a personal level. for many years bailey has been the go-to person when people need to get things done. without a doubt she has been an invaluable resource to my entire staff, to me and the people of maryland. but she is also a tireless advocate and a voice for families and individuals who may not have had the understanding or resources to access the services they need. what whether it's working with t
: this is a huge throw and measure 60 in. by 80 in. as a lugehelmet a landscape of the city and stadium of the team'sthose teams where they play. >>host: a one and ensure you see that your teams receivable the government and remember i wanna take one second because upright beautiful and as a great graphic and story to tell. this is going to be on your skin and i want to deceive the sure but because it is a soft cozy and winter decadent material that everyone will love and wrap themselves around it. i almost feel like we should call it a blanket and not throw because for example if you have kids that are going off to college it is great and perfect sizing for dorm rooms. many times you do not watch football alone it is big enough for many people to underneath it. the features are fantastic and everybody talks about how they wash well and they get softer the colors never believed our fate. ifown one of these throes would love to hear from you during the presentation. this is a perfect gift for everybody on last and we will start to see some of the team's ball out. we the dallas cowboys which is pop
to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to hold that post. she's a former national security advisor under president george w. bush. she is also the cofounder of the center for a new generation, which is an innovative afterschool enrichment program, and she is the co-author of numerous books, including two bestsellers. she is an undergraduate degree from the university of denver, a masters from notre dame, and a phd from the university of denver. mr. klein and doctor rice are going to be discussing a report that they have authored, which has been published in march of this year by the council on foreign relations. among many things, this report notes that while the united states invests more in k-12 public education than many other developed countries, students are woefully il
in the city were paying less taxes than their cleaners and the government has sorted out. >> not to be remembered as the prime minister introduced regulation of the press, an essential part of a free democracy. would you agree with me that regulation derives -- you are pregnant or not pregnant. you either have state regulation or you don't. there is no alternative third way. >> i would agree with my hon. friend. is it a free press? absolutely vital for free democracy? we should recognize all the press has done and should continue to do to uncover wrongdoing, stand up to the powerful. whatever changes we make we want a robust and free press in our country. >> research by the charity save the children, reveals shockingly that in our country when seven children does not have a warm coat this winter. the government is cutting child benefits support to 100,000 families who look out for disabled children. whenever our views on how our economic problems were brought about, surely it cannot be right that the poorest and most vulnerable hay -- [shouting] >> the point i make is we
these detainees whom we won't send to other countries and cities and towns across the united states of america? the federal government's primary responsibility is to keep the american people safe. keeping these detainees at gitmo accomplishes that goal. i urge my colleagues to support the ayotte amendment and i would yield -- excuse me -- and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: a senator: mr. president. the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: i also ask i be recognized as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. inhofe: the senator from georgia is exactly right. ayotte i don't think in the years i've been here where everyone is in agreement with. we go back to 2007. 94 members of this senate got together and they said -- and this is all documented -- that detainees housed at guantanamo bay should not be released into american society or transferred stateside into facilities. we all he agreed on that and again in 2009 and every year since then as the senator from georgia says. a lot of people have forgotten. we've had this issue for so ma
inculcating the squawks one thing is in the big city it's easy to inculcate this in the city where you come across people look different all the time. then i also talk about literature. when i was a kid i didn't come across people were different all the time and i learned about religious minorities, african-americans, i learned from books there was a particular author i talk about who was a pennsylvania woman that wrote books about religious minorities and she particularly focused on the minorities that had lives that seemed constraining and one of my favorite books when i was little was about a little quaker girl once the dresses her classmates had and she hates that her mother is urging her to wear this so then one day set in the pogo of the underground railroad a woman comes to is a sleeve on the underground railroad she sees this little girl and knows right away this is somebody that stands up for me and will help me so she asks can you find me a place to hide and she realizes the religion has constraints about positive ideas in the social justice and then she becomes proud so it is rat
. >> there was a study done a couple years ago, people participating in a city, germany, the united states and sweden and they asked a battery of questions, the united states respondents distrust of government more than the other countries. one question that stood out is to i trust our government to protect me and the american cancer know was off the scale, ten or 15 points. >> part of the reason for that they be related to the subject of skinny quality we have been talking about, we have such a high level of inequality, economic inequality and inevitably it gets translated to political inequality and particularly given the rules of the game like the rules of the economic game determining how economic system plays out, high levels of the quality, we have of political rules of the game, like citizens united that give scope and money we have moved closer to a system rather than one person one vote to one dollar one vote and that becomes self reenforcing so you have more political inequalities that generates laws and regulations that leads to more economic inequality and political inequality. a -- an ex
there are no president cities -- protestants. there are representatives from the new york city burrows, one from queens, ruth ginsburg from -- tragically staten island is unrepresented. so those are some facts about the supreme court which i home are interesting. here's a fact about the supreme court that's important. there are five republicans and four democrats. the supreme court to me, anyway, is most important as a political institution that renders largely political judgments about the issues that come before it. i don't say that as criticism. i often, in forums like this -- why do they have to do so much politics. can't they just decide the law? well, when they decide questions like, does the constitution protect a woman's right to abortion, does a university consider race in admission. those are as much political decisions as legal issues, and i am most concerned about the cower as a ideological and political institution and that's reflected through the personalities of the justices, but mostly it's reflected through their ideology, and i am obviously very interested in the justices as people, b
and chancellor of the new york city public schools joel kline had a somewhat on education reform in washington examining america's education system and the impact on national security. council on foreign relations moderates the discussion, about an hour. >> welcome to this evening, broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament to two things. one is how the education reform has ripened, a combination of meade, the talent we see in this room has coalesced on the issue of new technologies but there is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i am a great believer that two things matter in life. won his ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change, the real driver of history. when you unpack it all and jeb bush is a perfect example. the coming together of a person with real talent and drive with a set of ideas and this is one of them. the fact that you are all here is the greatest salute you could give. condoleezza rice and i come out of a national security background. we use to mess around with something called the ra
harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation and why we are supporting the project you're going to hear about today. starting about 30 years ago a
and whatever decision is taken on the future of shipbuilding the navy will be a major employer in the city, not once the new carriers arrived in a few years time and i am sure my hon. friend will welcome the peninsula, twenty-five billion pound package that could create 1,000 few jobs. >> margaret beckley. >> in june of 2010 the prime minister said despite the deficit reduction plan he would only assure there was, quote, note increase in child politics. the fees stand by that? >> we are doing everything we can to tackle child poverty and it has come down. the point that we specifically did was we increased the element of the child tax credit that goes to the poorest families. >> in the wake of criminal convictions of the staff who repeatedly abused people living at hospital is it not time those who take the fees employee the staff and supervise staff are themselves held to account with a new offense of corporate neglect? >> i listened carefully to the point my right hon. friend makes, there have been some appalling incidents of completely unacceptable levels of care and people in those org
-821 every time we shows up in carson city itself out. >>guest: this is a certified ministate 63 its and original carson city silver dollar that you are born to receive rights to their parent >>host: this is an historical piece the history and again i never 821 it is a limited quantity with only 30 available to go.we are going to go to ourand 19 our 1878 morganhour 1878 morgan silver dollar 7- over-8 tail feathers coin. >>guest: wednesday ingrate the dyes on as they put the original tells the others and you know that the eagles can have an even number 0 of tail brothers and flyback that have a on number of tail other supply. this was in the year flyn odd number of others to flyfeathers flay.y. bear 80 of colors or seven little interspersed part of the daughters and a reuse them a embroided lip this over if you do not mind. let's go of some top and you can see right it is per-share issue one of theat and rare american morgan silver dollars if you go or is the website they have that and it belittles the paper comes included and it is also silbert so the price $119 is i think is a b
contractor who drive federal express trucks around the city. real small businesses should be given relief and given incentives to hire people and what happens is that increasing the tax rate on passive investors is held hostage by the fear we'll cost jobs in the small business economy. there are important ways to think about policy, and this will be my final point. i don't want to go on beyond my share, but one of the things that was true at andrews on both the congressional side and on the administration side was that the staff work had been done. the cbo was prepared. the joint committee on taxation had met with our office at the treasury, and we had options that you have still not heard of that, for raising revenues. we have thought of all sorts of ways to do things, and we could limit, itemize deductions in at least 17 different ways, and we have revenue estimates on them because we knew somebody's going to want to know just like that. i am not convinced that the staff work we began, certainly by the early part of the 1990s and late 89 before i got there, has been done at the same lev
, exploration, love of learning and literature, a natural combination for the city of boston at wbur so i am proud to be here especially for this panel. before i introduce the three amazing women who are sitting to my right a couple quick reminders. one is cellphones if you have already been given that reminder, please turn them off or at the very least silence. we are in the smart phone generation. i ask you, urged you to resist the word to tweet or facebook or look stuff up during this panel. great conversation is the focus. this is being recorded for broadcast on c-span and after the panel today at 12:15 there will be a book signing where all three of these women will be available behind the lectern to sign copies of their books. a reminder on all those fronts. without further ado, please let me introduce to you three incredible women. first, governor and ambassador madeline kunin from 1985. [applause] >> to 1991, she was governor of vermont and later united states ambassador to switzerland and liechtenstein and is author this book "the new feminist agenda: defining the next revolution fo
totally carry this, my sons would carry this. >>guest: my son is a lawyer in new york city he does not check luggage. he was like i want the black. i was like ok. you are not getting it yet. >>host: it is very classy. my son is a huge international traveler, same thing. and they are picky. they want to look nice.if you are shopping for your son or grandson or a son-in-3 they traveled little bit, this is an incredible gift. >>guest: or the husband or men in your life. >>host: for us, you can see how classy this looks. >>guest: the black is pretty. >>host: it is hard to pick. >>guest: i want to open up the browned. this becomes your trunk. -- you could take the drawers out and lay it down like itor regular suitcase. i have boots slippers. you can fit so much,2500 cubic inches of storage capacity. then you zip it up so you never need to pack or unpack when you go anywhere. you get the shoulder strap for the barrel-tote. luggage cuff. it snaps on the handle and even on your if you want to. then you get the hanging toiletry bag we put a carry-on luggage. and you get the luggag
away, the villages and cities, and brought them to the ridgelines and the mountaintops where we had seized the drink of build weapons around at all the to tactical firepower initiative that you ever want to have. and it goes without saying the soldiers did extremely valor things. and one of those missions, one of our soldiers has just been notified he is been -- posthumously. but nfib was a much large human beings on human beings fighting. and it took 12 hours to do this. five companies in contact at once. very, very difficult. but the in state of that was all the political entities, the provincial towns, the governor, the district governor in the area were ecstatic that finally something had been done to this growing insurgent problem that kept coming in to kunar. it was a festering cancer that had metastasize and was destabilizing everything. so that was the first thing to do in the first three months was pushed that bubble back, and then from then on we did a series of operations like that to expand the security bubbles elsewhere. ending with units three and four in april of 2011
. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is
ddt on a million civilians in italy and halted a typhus outbreak threatened the city. well, through the 1940s and 1850s and early 1960s, ddt kind of goes everywhere. and as it does, other insect sites chemically similar are developed, so there is a hole every of pesticides coming common use initially in military settings, but then after the war and forestry, agriculture, residential, things used in hospitals, commercial buildings and homes and lots and lots of different products. one of the problems for spraying poison from airplanes as it's really hard to control where it goes and yet this was done extensively. these are all classic. i grew up in florida where there was encephalitis as an epidemic that corrupted because the mosquitoes transmit brain disease. tracks like this have come from a neighborhood of limited my brothers and i would get his teeth into that mark as they possibly could because it was really fun. again, it was everywhere, thought to be harmless to people. although, i should say that carson's entries in ddt was based on evidence that it is not entirely safe. agai
is like we will show you. there is a menu you press show traffic and it scans the whole city showing you live traffic information. so you know the fastest way to get to work in the morning. turn by turn directions. >>host: the cell- phone i have right now is the contract obviously. the that you get by the way. i am spending $200 per month and i cannot get traffic on my phone. a lot of the things you can do with this cannot do with mind that i am spending $200 per month. --mine are the least bit skeptical, you need to wrap your brain around it. no contract or credit checks. you pay as you go. you are never out of money because you only buy what you need.you probably will not need to get airtime for ya year because you get $140 worth. remember,if your purchase is a gift, hsn's return policy is now extended until january 31st, 2013! this applies until december 20, 2012. i would absolutely get it. you get this home and put it under the tree they will lose their minds. for parents of america you want a real smartphone because you get one pretending to be one they will be . get your first c
of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the congressional and presidential studies program at catholic university. he's gotmuy a degree with the university of scot lat, and a ph.d., and authored numerous publications. second speaker is norm, really doesn't need and introduction, writes for with the roll call," and he's an analyst at cbs news, author of several books which they may have read, "the broken branch: how the congress is failing america," "it's worse than it looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." he's been quotedded probably too many times for any data base to collect in one place. in the 1990s, there was an article i was in somewhere quoted, and you were quoted, and your quote was i have no idea. i thought to
. all we need is her name address and we could even ship it to another in another city or state it does not cost you anything. $39.99 plus tax today and it gets shipped within 48 hours. anybody who calls after theext two hours i would say in all likelihood will go into extended delivery. they may have to wait a little bit longer to get their kindle- fire.and here is what you get.you get the usb that is how charge it stylus earbudsa $25 gift certificate. aaron berger is esses are electronic expert. he has sold every single tablet (...) >>guest: known to man, womanild >>host: that is not an exaggeration. >>guest: we have got to sell a lot of great tablets but not more popular than this. it probably has been the most popular today's special i have done with 25,000 out the door. and it is 3:00 p.m. in the afternoon. --4:00 p.m.. it is the lowest price we have ever done on the can pole, we have sold the kindle-fire before- a-kid pole. kindle 13 do on any tablet for the rest of thef you want to do email watch a video, download movies applications this is it. this is the one. the top sel
in public as so many school committees and city councils around this country raced to do. and for this white house people seem to view it as an inconvenience and annoyance when you bring enough that they're not offering that level of transparency. so i think it is both the difficulty of wrestling agencies to the ground and some sort of lack of commitment at the top two the ideals of transparency, particularly when there is any political downside. one of your colleagues said in one of my stores a few months ago that as soon as you collide with something that has a political downside transparency goes by the wayside. that is essentially what i think has happened in many instances. the transparency folks can often carry the day when it is something that the mainstream press is not really interested in. the moment it gets into the spotlight, that values seems to slip pretty far down on the scale of what the white house said. >> ask you to follow pieces. one has to do with the administration has made new commitments, for example, they reaffirmed the commitments for the office of regulatory -- eve
to overcome an object city national minority -- obstinate minority. cloture is needed, we're told, because members of the minority refuse to stop delaying. but does filing cloture hon a matter, be it a bill, amendment, or conference report, on the very same day the senate is considering that matter indicate a minority that is prolonging debate or does it indicate a majority that is eager not to have a debate at all? to me, a habitual effort to file cloture on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider the matter indicates the latter. and what do the numbers show about the use of cloture by this democratic majority? according to c.r.s., the current senate majority has filed cloture on a amendmen a matter y same day it considered the matter three and a half more times than the senate republicans did it when they were in the majority. the current democratic majority has done so well over 100 times. to put it another way, senate democrats are much more apt to try to shut off debate on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider a matter than were previous majorities, including mo
is vital to speak at the in london all the resources they need city operations to roster and elveden can be completed as soon as possible looks like a timetable of three years. >> on the first point, the prime minister did refer to part 2 and reiterated that as a government or attitude as a whole has not changed for the day it was established. he also explained part 2 is affected by the criminal investigations being conducted right now. as far as the criminal investigations, of course we will endeavor where we can to make sure resources are provided can be completed as quickly as possible. >> mr. speaker, the first duty of the prime minister is to support the prime minister. we've seen something that never happened before in parliamentary history. without the doctrine doctrine of collective responsibility swished away by the deputy prime minister. how can he spend 25 minutes criticizing my right honorable friend and remain in the government collects is he considering resigning? >> mr. speaker, he and i had this exchange countless times. i just really think he still struggles to get coali
. great for the kitchen or bathroom mid-cities the. use the power of steam. >>host: you are getting two of them you could always get more and save on shipping. you will get the lavender and the pretty int #211-049, and the pretty mint [♪ music ♪] >>host: guess what is coming up at midnight? brand- new today's special featuring our good friend chef todd english he is featuring premium bakeware. it is amazing. it is the world also make sure that you tune in to get yours is perfect for the holiday baking season. of what lynn murphy has coming up but here is some information onfriend todd english. we will be right back. [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] >>host: good morning thank you to read into hsn. i am opposed lynn murphy and the beautiful marilyn miglin is here for about one of her final shows of the visit. we have never done this before with any pheromone kit. we have four flex payments. how6 c13 $15 down to get this, in the next few days? is a best seller by itself you will also get the full-sized bath and shower gel body lotion, up about buttercream in a beautiful gift
county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the city hall and they said, does this mean we have to build a new restroom for the disabled quakes the answer was yes and curb cuts and other changes that seem so superficial to many, but bitterly whether or not a disabled person can be part of america. what we did 22 years ago was really novel because if you look at the course of american history, i think we have distinguished ourselves in successive generations by expanding the reach of freedom and opportunity. think how many times who do not. if you go back to the earliest days of this great nation with older white men sat together and decided who would rule america, they were thinking about those of color. they were thinking about women. they were thinking about the disabled and they sure weren't thinking about those who work property owners. it was an elite group that would form our quote democracy. then suggested generations of americans decided if democracy went anything, if america meant anything we needed to expand the reach of opportunity each generation. the bloodiest
violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and throughout the region, aqim we believe may now use its safe haven in northern mali to plan for regional or trans-national terrorist attacks. and just as we should not have ignored developments in afghanistan which seemed a remote and troubled country when the taliban took it over more than a dozen years ago, so, too, we would ignore the chaos in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has rec
and the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the cities of paris. q. and a sunday night at eight on c-span.
areas of all new york city. i was on the ground from the moment the storm started. the amount of devastation that i saw was unimaginable. 24 staten islanders lost their lives. families lost everything. homes were literally torn off their foundations. some collapsed. large boats, yachts were scattered deepened the neighborhoods piled up on two peoples homes. more than 100,000 were without power for weeks. people slept in a cold, damp home, and for his of to move to a shelter because we were afraid of losing. the streets were dark. they were littered with what was once their home and their personal belongings. and as a community and as a city, we came together and we cleaned up the surface rather quickly. but there are still much deeper and continuing challenges that remain. families are still in shelters. the need for housing is one of our top priorities. others are struggling with fema and sba to receive adequate assistance. the our health concerns, fuel spilled into people's yards and homes. raw sewage backed up and filled peoples homes to this evening. homeowners are uncerta
and gifted leader. in a city where people stopped learning when they gain power, mike has shown that the closer you get to power, the more you need to humble yourself and learn new things. he's been montana toarg staff and others for -- mentoring staff and others on the hill for years in reading groups and bible studies and where he has shared his wisdom, his faith, and his heart. as many in the senate know, mike has a.l.s., lou gehrig's disease. for weeks, he's been battling, actually months, he's been battling to continue to fulfill his responsibilities here when most of us would have said it's too difficult, i can't do it. he's overcome challenges that most of us can scarcely imagine. he's done so with grace, humility, and an unbelievable level of courage. and through this, we have seen that he has inspired everybody on my team with both his spirit and his tenacity. in these difficult circumstances, mike has been an extraordinary servant and faithful leader. he's still the guy that cares more about other people than himself. the kindness he has shown to everyone he's encounte
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